Click on Topic of Interest

The hazards of alcohol-based hand sanitizers

The threat of fire, intentional teen alcohol abuse, and unintentional child alcohol poisoning are causing parents to question the value of alcohol-based hand sanitizers. View Videos

Alcohol hand santizers kill bacteria ONLY FOR SECONDS

The majority of all hand sanitizers us alcohol and the concentration must be over 62% in order to kill bacteria. But what most people don't know is that after rubbing one's hands together and the alcohol dries on the skin ... the bacterial killing effectiveness of alcohol is ZERO. That's right, touch a bacteria-laden bathroom door handle after alcohol dries on your skin and you're hands now have active bacteria on them, once again! What's more, at 62%+ alcohol, a hand sanitizer is flammable and many have exploded and caught fire.

Imaging the Post-Antibiotic Future

After 85 years, antibiotics are growing impotent. So what will medicine, agriculture and everyday life look like if we lose these drugs entirely?  Read Whole Article

75% of people use their phone on the toilet

A new survey has revealed that three quarters of people use their mobile phone while sitting on the toilet.

The poll of 2,000 people, conducted by Sony and O2, also revealed that a quarter of men choose to sit on the loo rather that stand, just so that their hands are free to use their mobiles. Read Whole Article

Women's handbags contain more bacteria than the average TOILET

Women’s handbags are contaminated with more bacteria than the average toilet, a new study has revealed.

Tests showed that one in five handbag handles is home to sufficient bacteria to pose a risk to human health. Read Whole Article

The shocking Bacteria Count of Daily Items ... the grossest cesspool
in your household, the sponge!

The dirt: Easily the grossest cesspool in your household, the sponge is often a culprit in spreading germs around when you use a dirty one to "clean'' other surfaces. It takes about a week for the germ count to get sky high. Read Whole Article

FDA: Anti-bacterial soaps may not curb bacteria

After more than 40 years of study, the U.S. government says it has found no evidence that common anti-bacterial soaps prevent the spread of germs, and regulators want the makers of Dawn, Dial and other household staples to prove that their products do not pose health risks to consumers. Read Whole Article

The hazards of alcohol-based hand sanitizers

The threat of fire, intentional teen alcohol abuse, and unintentional child alcohol poisoning are causing parents to question the value of alcohol-based hand sanitizers. View Videos

cartCart (Cart empty)

facebook twitter


Copyright © AP Goldshield, LLC. 2017,